1:24 scale dollhouse miniature kits
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Helpful tips

Working with plywood

Plywood, like many wood products, will warp due to changes in temperature and humidity, even over a matter of minutes. Plywood sheets should be stored flat and preferably weighted, right up until you are ready to use them. 

Sealing the parts will also help to minimise warping and can also help the glue stick to laser cut edges. When glued in your structure, you should not have any problems with warping or the finish.

Warped plywood is common and not considered damage. I do check each sheet I cut before cutting them as well as after cutting, but it can still warp. Warped ply sheets will not be replaced.

Process: allow the glue on your finished kits to dry thoroughly before painting. If you want, fill any little gaps with an interior gap filler, something that is easy to sand! Sand it smooth and wipe with a damp cloth. I don’t generally worry too much about gap filler on furniture but you can if you want. Paint the pieces with undercoat. You can get gesso at art/craft stores, or I often use water based interior house undercoat as I usually have it on hand. When dry, sand lightly. The 350 grit paper would be best. Sometimes a second undercoat is good, as the cut edges can soak in quite a bit of paint. Sand again. Then two coats of acrylic, with a light sand between if needed (I generally don’t find it needs that). If you want, you can apply an antiquing wash - water the paint down and brush on, or use a retarder or extender mixed with the paint, then wipe off with a damp sponge. Add more if desired. And lastly, you can paint on a coat of varnish (gloss, satin, matte) if you want. 

Lastly, have fun. I can answer questions if needed.


Advice on putting your kits together

Just go slowly and you will be fine. It helps to dry fit things, before gluing, just to check fit. Sand gently if needed. I use a 180 to 350 grit sandpaper. 

You can remove the charring on the cut edges using alcohol or water and a cotton bud. It’s a good idea to remove the char if you want to stain parts. It also helps the glue to stick. Stain parts before gluing, if that is your preferred finish. Otherwise, you can paint after construction or as recommended in the instructions.

I use Weldbond glue, which is available at hardware stores. It is pricey, but really good. Useful for lots of stuff. As for paint, I just use craft paints. I have Folkart brand, which I like. Artist paints are likely to have too much body, and you won’t get such a smooth finish. Paint is really a personal preference though.
 


Process for assembly

Allow the glue on your finished kits to dry thoroughly before painting. If you want, fill any little gaps with an interior gap filler, something that is easy to sand! Sand it smooth and wipe with a damp cloth. I don’t generally worry too much about gap filler on furniture but you can if you want. If you want a very smooth surface, such as for metal items, a little gap filler can help smooth the surfaces and joins. Sand gently when dry.

Paint the pieces with undercoat. You can get gesso at art/craft stores, or I often use water based interior house undercoat as I usually have it on hand. When dry, sand lightly. The 350 grit paper would be best. Sometimes a second undercoat is good, as the cut edges can soak in quite a bit of paint. Sand again. Then two coats of acrylic, with a light sand between if needed (I generally don’t find it needs that). If you want, you can apply an antiquing wash - water the paint down and brush on, or use a retarder or extender mixed with the paint, then wipe off with a damp sponge. Add more if desired. And lastly, you can paint on a coat of varnish (gloss, satin, matte) if you want.